Unit Objectives:


  • Examine the causes, course and consequences of the French Revolution.
  • The student understands how the French Revolution contributed to transformations in Europe and the world.
  • Analyze how the Seven Years War, Enlightenment thought, the American Revolution, and growing internal economic crisis affected social and political conditions in Old Regime France.
  • Explain how the French Revolution developed from constitutional monarchy to democratic despotism to the Napoleonic empire.
  • Analyze leading ideas of the revolution concerning social equality, democracy, human rights, constitutionalism, and nationalism and assess the importance of these ideas for democratic thought and institutions in the 20th century.
  • Explain how the revolution affected French society, including religious institutions, social relations, education, marriage, family life, and the legal and political position of women.
  • Describe how the wars of the revolutionary and Napoleonic period changed Europe and assess Napoleon’s effects on the aims and outcomes of the revolution.
  • Compare the political roles of Creole elites, the Catholic Church, and mestizo, mulatto, and Indian populations in the independence movements.
  • Analyze the influence of the American, French, and Haitian revolutions, as well as late 18th-century South American rebellions, on the development of independence movements in Latin America.
  • Analyze the political and ideological objectives of the independence movements between 1808 and 1830 and explain why these movements succeeded.
  • Write creatively and critically about the French Revolution in a narrative format.
  • Peer-edit classmates' writing using research-based strategies.
  • Read critically using research-based strategies.

The Age of Absolutism (1500-1800)

Birth of modern state
Based on the “Divine Right of Kings” = “God institutes monarchy for the welfare of the people.”, est’d for Louis XIV
Monarch cannot do as he pleases but must act in the best interests of the people.
Developed due to civil wars of the Reformation
Absolute monarchy: military, tax collection, and judicial system under authority of the king
Powers formerly in the hands of aristocracy
National/civil bureaucracy was formed to administer government and keep aristocracy and church in check
Aristocracy was partially assumed into bureaucracy
Consolidated the church into a national entity with government control over clergy
Most of the practices of the modern state were more or less instituted in the France of Louis XIV: centralized government, a centralized civil bureaucracy, national legislation, a national judiciary that controlled most judicial activity, a large, standing military under the direct, rather than indirect, control of national authorities, and a national tax collection mechanism in which taxes went straight to the national government rather than passing through the hands of regional nobility.
“Theater of power” = Versailles and “Sun King” role
Revolution of tax system = better collection and distribution of national wealth
Dissolved parliaments and General Assembly by exiling those who vetoed policy
Focused on religious unity
Other examples: Spain--Phillip II, Prussia-Brandenburg (Germany)--Frederick the Great, Austria-Hungary--Habsburg, and Russia--Peter the Great

HW: Read the following articles from ABC-CLIO and take notes for discussion next class. Reading with Notes Due: Oct. 9th 2009 for block B,C and E and Oct. 12th for blocks F.

"Absolutism." World History: The Modern Era. 2008. ABC-CLIO. 7 Oct. 2008 <http://www.worldhistory.abc-clio.com>.


"Absolutism in France (Overview)." World History: The Modern Era. 2008. ABC-CLIO. 7 Oct. 2008 <http://www.worldhistory.abc-clio.com>.


"Louis XIV: France's Sun King." World History: The Modern Era. 2008. ABC-CLIO. 7 Oct. 2008 <http://www.worldhistory.abc-clio.com>.




Who is absolutely absolute?



Catherine_the_Great.jpg
1. Catherine the Great
Catherine II The Great ABC-CLIO Article



Frederick_the_Great.jpg
2. Fredrick the Great

Frederick II The Great ABC-CLIO Article


King_Louis_XIV.jpg
3. King Louis XIV

King Louis XIV ABC-CLIO Article


Peter_the_Great.jpg
4. Peter I the Great

Peter I The Great ABC-CLIO Article


King_Philip_II.jpg
5. King Philip II

King Philip II ABC-CLIO Article

Directions--
1. Break up into groups of 3-4.
2. Read one of the following documents that will be assigned by your teacher.
3. While reading the document pullout: a) What makes your person an absolute ruler? b) What unique characteristics does your monarch have? c) What time period did your person live? d) What would it be like to live under this person as a lord/noble or peasant? and e) What changes in the society, economy, or other factors do we see (minimum of two factors)? Answers will be due for 10/12 for B block, on 10/13 for C, E and F. Put all answers on the discussion tab above. Clearly state your name and character.
4. On the due date, we will discuss your answers with each other in your groups. Collaborate, share and compare! (10 minutes)
5. You will be broken up into different groups.
6. In your new group, you will take on the persona of your assigned character and interview each other. The topic of the discussion will be: Who is "absolutely absolute?" (10-15 minutes) (Mr. S had fun with this question! )

STUDENT WORK GALLERY LINKS :

WH Spivey B 2009-10
WH Spivey C 2009-10
WH Spivey E 2009-10
WH Spivey F 2009-10



What is a "Theme" and how do we use them in history?


Understanding Themes--
So far as a class, we have learned a number of key ways to breakup and organize information. As a quick reminder let go over these ideas:
1. Factor of analysis
2. Incentives
3. Perspective
4. Time Periods or Ages

We will now introduces a new way in which we will organize information. We will use what is know as a "Theme." For us to understand what a theme is lets first put it in a perspective that we all can easily understand and enjoy. I was fortune enough to have a good childhood. My parents gave me all the necessities need in life including education, food, clothing and a trip to Disneyland. Is Disneyland truly a necessity you ask? Well as a historian the answer is yes. There are some cool historical references in the rides and shows that are infused into the park. This would include a roller-coaster representing mans first journeys into space or introducing Americas heroes such as Abraham Lincoln using animated ROBOTS! Super cool! So what does this have to do with themes you may ask. To get a deeper understanding lets take a couple of minutes and look at the Disney Worlds Magical Kingdom.

1. Click on link and explore the map ( http://www.wdwinfo.com/maps/MK.htm)
2. Identify the zones of the park
3. Look at the rides that are in each park and make logical connections to the zone it resides.
4. Discuss personal observations in small groups.

As a class we will come back together and define what "theme" means. As a class, we will publish the approved definition of the discussion tab of this page. From here we will start with our first historical theme.... REVOLUTION!!!


Part One: Using Revolution as a Theme

Setting Up the Stage for "The French Revolution"


We have just finished looking at a number of factors of analysis that helped us understand: "How the West Won?" We will continue our journey of history by looking at a single event (this will help us understand the broader theme of "Revolution" in the future) and explore how it would change human history forever. For the next week or so, we will be looking at the French Revolution. From a micro-level, it is a bloody, confusing mess that has more twists in the story than most Korean soap operas. From a macro-level, the implications of the French Revolution changed human society forever, but let's take this one step at a time. Before we begin, let's think about what we already know.

1. What was the Age of Absolutism?
2. What was the Scientific Revolution?
3. What was the Age of Enlightenment?
4. What is an enlightened despot?

When looking at the combination of these ideas, the question then becomes what is going to happen next. You have the answer in the French Revolution, but what happened during the revolution? Well, it depends on whom you ask. A historian will tell you the overall picture, but what would a noble of the time period tell you? How about King Louis the XVI or Marie Antoinette? Is the story going to be different for a farmer or a philosopher? The answer is yes. Therefore, we will react to history by taking on personas of the time period, but before we do that, we need to understand what France was like during the 1790's.

But before we do that we need to understand what life was like in France prior to the French Revolution. Therefore our first task is to get some uniform background information:

1. Click on the KIS Server
2. Click on HS
3. Click on HS_Student_Share
4. Click on World History 9th Grade
5. Download Robespierre French Revolution PDF file onto your computer. If you simply open the file at school, you will not be able to open file at home. This task must be accomplished here at school.

Homework:
Read chapter 1-3, that was uploaded on your computer. While you are reading the document make sure that you take notes and analyze what you read. Own the text! Read this secondary source as though you were reading a primary source, one line at a time and pay close attention to the main ideas and supporting details.

Part Two: Setting Foundation


French Revolution Wikipedia Article

The whole 9th grade class will be creating a Wikipedia for the French Revolution. But what makes this wiki unique is that it will be 100% student-created and maintained. This will be used throughout the project for research purposes. Each class will be designated a factor of analysis for the time period. Look at past lessons if you forget what factors of analysis are. After reading the text, look at what factor you need to analyze as a class.

Authority engaged in the administration to exert control and power through the establishment of structural organization and laws.
Class
Factor of Analysis
Class Created Definition of Assigned Factor
Spivey F
Culture

Culture?
Spivey E
Political
Define Political
--Authority engaged in the administration to exert control and power through the establishment of structural organization and laws.
Spivey C
Economics
--Economics is the study of how to use limited resources and how limited resources should distribute.
Spivey B
Social
Definition of Social!!! : )
Through the factors of analysis above you pick a topic on which you will become an expert. For example, if your class was assigned culture you could pick 'fashion.' Therefore, you would research fashion trends for the first, second, and third estate. If you have questions, please raise your hand and we will gladly help you at this point.


Task: Contribute a single article to the 9th Grade French Revolution Wiki.

Format:
  • Each article should have a min. of 300 to 500 words.
  • All writing should be in your own words. If quotes are used, they should not be any longer than 2 sentences long. No more than two quotes should be used in any one article.
  • Paragraph form. No bullet points.
  • Cosmetically well-arranged, including but not limited to pictures/movies and should easy to navigate if there is more than one page.
  • Works cited at the bottom of the page. You are welcome to use easybib.com. JUST PUTTING THE URL IS NOT ACCEPTABLE! You should consult at least 3 websites and/or print resources. Check out the following websites for reliable information on the French Revolution.
  • Your wiki article will be due next class.

Wiki Article Rubric external image msword.png French Revolution Wiki Article Rubric.doc



Stage Three: Peer Editing French Revolution Wiki


Today, I want you to become constructive critics of your partner's work. This will be the first of many opportunities you will have this year to critique each other's writing. Now, I want you to reinforce the main components of a successful essay that I outlined for you before you took your mid-quarter test. The same guidelines apply to your French Revolution Wikipedia article. Please follow these steps when peer-editing your partner's work and take time to make your partner and yourself better writers today.

  • Go to your partner's work on the 9th Grade French Revolution Wiki.
  • Click "Edit This Page" and begin correcting errors you see while you read your partner's work for the first time. In addition to correcting errors, underline aspects of the writing you like and bold parts of the writing that need revision.
  • When you are finished, hold down the Apple key and click on the Discussion tab. This will open up the Discussion tab while also keeping your partner's article tab open. This will allow you to click easily back and forth between tabs.
  • Start a Discussion thread and copy and paste the following checklist into it. Go through this checklist and give your partner feedback on his or her work.

1. Can you identify the main idea or thesis in this article? Yes/No Write the thesis here:

2. Does the introduction have a compelling hook? Yes/No

3. Does the introduction give an outline of what the author is going to talk about? Yes/No

4. Is the writing clear and understandable? Yes/No

5. Does the essay have a clearly organized body with ideas separated into paragraphs? Yes/No

6. Does each paragraph begin with a topic sentence? Yes/No

7. Does each paragraph end with a transition sentence, smoothly connecting the ideas of the previous paragraph to the next? Yes/No

8. Does the essay contain facts to support the claims made? Yes/No

9. Does the conclusion restate the main points of the essay in a new way and give a sense of completion to the essay? Yes/No

10. Other comments:



  • When you are done with the checklist, post it in the Discussion section.
  • Now, take a look at the History tab of your article page and compare your draft with your partner's. Then, hold down the Apple key and click on the Discussion tab so you can see your partner's comments.
  • Revise your article for homework.


Stage Four: Creating a Place in Time


Next step we will create characters for the French Revolution. While you are exploring the wiki your teacher will have you draw a persona out of a hat. Your teacher will then write down the results for each class.

Character Creation
Task: Using your background knowledge from Reading 1 (Origins of the French Revolution), create your character.
Process: Copy the prompts below. Paste them to your own diary's wiki page. Then, use the prompts to help yourself imagine and create a character that is a) historically accurate, and b) interesting to you and us. Brainstorm (meaning write) your ideas for these prompts on your own wiki diary page. Example of character sheet: Artist Example 2008-9

Name:
Age:
Gender:
Occupation:
Social Class:
Financial situation:
Appearance:
Location (Map of France, Map of Paris ): Must be in the Paris region.
Habitual locations:
Daily routine:
Personality/Quirks/Unique Personality Traits:
Past/individual-family history:
Family:
Social relations with your own and other classes (people you deal with or know about in other classes, AND your opinions and feelings about them):
Religion:
Education:
Style of speaking in France:
Languages you speak:
Main privileges and/or conflicts:
Portrait:

Class Assignment:

Ant Farm #1
WH Spivey B 2009-10
WH Spivey E 2009-10

Ant Farm #2
WH Spivey C 2009-10

WH Spivey F 2009-10

Setting Up the Scene

Reading is going to be a very important part of this unit. While you are reading your text, there are two tasks that need to be kept in mind. (a) You are reading as a learner of history in the modern day world. (b) While reading remember your character and think logically how they would react to each situation.

Reading More Effectively

1. COMFORT
Your body must be comfortable for you to read effectively. If you are lying down, propping yourself up, standing on a crowded subway car, or unrelaxed, your mind will not be focused because energy will be taken on those other stimuli. Find a place where you are comfortable (not so comfortable that you fall asleep, mind you!) and can fully focus on your reading.

2. PACING
I realize that I have given you challenging reading assignments to try and get you prepared for a challenging high school curriculum. Many of you are trying to tackle these readings in one night; you will be more successful if you spend the first night trying to get the main ideas of the reading and the second night gathering supporting details, key people, important events, and main ideas. Spread it out, stop when you get tired, and don't wait until the last minute to read for class.

3. THESIS
Just like I will always look for a well-developed thesis in your work, you should be trying to find the thesis of every work you read in this class in the author's introduction. This will help you figure out exactly what the author is trying to tell you. Sometimes, the author may have multiple thesis statements, so identify all the main thesis points within the introduction before proceeding to the body of the text. From now on, I will be challenging you to identify the thesis statements and explain them to me in your own words each time we have a reading.

4. SECTION HEADINGS
Every section heading in your readings and textbook are a key to the main points being given. Do not just skip or skim these to move on to the text. Take a moment to register these and use them as a guide to help you read more successfully. Ask yourself a question using the section heading when you are done reading and see if you can explain the key ideas competently. You may also do this as a review tool later when preparing for class or studying for the chapter quiz.

5. KEY IDEAS
We have now had two quizzes based on your reading, and the average has been in the 70% range, which is a standard bell curve and shows that a majority of you have a "satisfactory" level of understanding of American history up to the Revolutionary era. However, I know most of you are not content with "satisfactory," and you will certainly want to perform better at the college level. Therefore, I recommend that you actively read to anticipate the key ideas I will assess on quizzes and take note of them. Simply highlighting or underlining will not be sufficient; you must interact with the textbook because simply reading it will not be effective enough to fully understand the material.

6. FACTS & FIGURES
Okay, this may be mind-numbing, but many of you need to add more concrete, specific evidence to your essay responses if you want to be successful writers in history class. After you identify key ideas in your reading, write them down and add some specific details about the key ideas that you could possibly use to reinforce them on a timed essay. Try to psych the test and me out and actively anticipate what types of facts are relevant and which ones you can leave on the page. This skill will take time for you to develop but will be so rewarding later. The question I asked most on your last exam was "how?" and "why?." Some supporting evidence would have eliminated these annoying questions.

7. REFLECTION
Full reading comprehension only occurs when you reflect on what you read. That means that you must revisit notes you take and highlights you make along the way. It also means that you need to stop and ask yourself, "Why is this important or significant to history and the world today?" and "How did this impact the time period I am studying?" Through reflection, you will hopefully understand your reading more fully and feel more successful on World History assessments.

external image pdf.png crossdisc.pdf

Homework Due Next Class:
1. Have character sheets finished and posted on the wiki under your name. Make sure that you create a link for your character creation sheet. I want your dairy entries, which we will start next class, to be separated from your character sheet.
2. Make corrections on wiki.
3. Look back at your notes chapters 1-3. The purpose of this is to remind ourselves of what has already been learned.
4. Read chapter 4. Make sure to take notes while reading. This will be critical for creating effective "Ant Farm" diaries. We will soon put our ideas in the Cause, Course and Consequence format. Here is a visual organizer that may use to get a head start:
external image msword.png Causes-Course-Consequences.doc



Stage Five: French Revolution Ant Farm


tennis_court_oath-400.jpg
The Tennis Court Oath 20th June 1789 by Jacques-Louis David


Rules of the Ant Farm (READ THIS!):

  1. No murdering other students' characters--you CAN murder other students' characters' relations.
  2. IF you kill another student's character's family member, you MUST notify them on the discussion page of their character's wiki.
  3. You have to suffer the consequences of your actions in all following diaries. If you kill somebody in diary 1, it can't disappear in diary 2. Keep the story going.
  4. There should be a realistic, convincing reason for all actions you take. Take risks and show the tensions and madness of this period, yes; but be careful--don't be silly; be convincing.
  5. You can always converse and interact with more people than assigned.
  6. If you read something that bothers you, privately inform the teacher. Your privacy will be protected.


Diary Grading Criteria:

  • Credibility / Realism: Are your character's actions believable to the reader? Do we understand the reasons he/she does what she does?
  • Historical Accuracy: Do you include convincing and accurate historical details in your "historical fiction"?
    • Include at least one detail (image or dialogue) that shows the following factors in your character's life:
      • social factors
      • political factors
      • economic factors
      • cultural factors
      • daily life
  • Creativity: Are your character, your events, and your writing imaginative, full of images, drama?
  • Collaboration: Are you giving good feedback--based on the feedback questions--to your assigned peer review partners?

Ant Farm Diary Entry #1: Your first diary will be of a day in the life of your character in the year 1788 (the year before the Revolution broke out) that reflects the tensions in France during that time. Think of the causes we discussed that would be effecting your daily life. For each character, the causes should be different! In your first entry, you must include a reference to an article in the 9th Grade French Revolution Wiki that pertains to your character by linking your source. Entries are due at the end of class.

Ant Farm #1
WH Spivey B 2009-10
WH Spivey E 2009-10

Ant Farm #2
WH Spivey C 2009-10

WH Spivey F 2009-10

Ant Farm Diary Homework Instructions:

From Crisis to Revolution-- Diary #2:

Task: You have read chapters 2-4. Choose ONE of the major events that happened in these chapters to continue your journal.
Length:
300-500 words per diary entry. (We will do a word count. It's not an essay, so you should let things fly--but do revise and polish.)
Due date: Next Class
Where to publish: On your character's diary page.
Collaboration Requirement: Collaborate with at least two characters or one other character and a link to a student made wiki article.
Grading standards: In each diary entry, show images of this event in France, as experienced by a person in the social class of your character. Give us glimpses of your character's environment, actions, and thoughts. Have them talk about, think about, and act with or against people from other classes also. Make it realistic. Give your character voice and personality. Include at least one detail (image or dialogue) that shows the following factors in your character's life during your chosen events.
Example: http://jspivey.wikispaces.com/Servant+Alex+L

Homework:
  • Complete Diary #2
  • Read: Start reading chapters 5-7
  • Find: The most interesting (and logical) five events in these years that your Diary Character could experience and write about in chapters 5-7.


Stage Six- Reflect, Pair and Collaborate! (F Block 28th, 2009)*


Reflect, Pair and Share:

Setup: You have taken notes on Chapters 2-4. Each of you have picked an event in which you wrote your second diary entry. For the first 5 minutes of "class" sit down with your notes and find all major events that your character might be involve in. For example if you are a guard you might be at the Estates General or the Storming of the Bastille.

Slide and Share: Using Skype or MSN as a supplement for this exercise. Pick anyone in the class work with. You only have one partner instead of three but follow instructions and close as you can. I will want feedback at some point to know how this worked and how we can make it better.*

  • Get in a circle with desks facing each other. Half of the class will be on the outside of the circle. The other half will be inside the circle. Those in the inside will be facing those in the outside of the circle.
  • For two minutes those on the inside will share who their character is and what events they see their characters being involved in. Those on the outside will ask questions that will challenge and validate if the chosen events apply to the social class in a realistic way.
  • An additional objective the "listener" is to write down any new events they did not use in their first journal and ask themselves if their character would be there or not. Try to put events in order in which they happen for practice. Do not stop the conversation for ordering the events. You may check your ordering for home work. It is STRONGLY recommended that you do this.. hint hint hint!
  • After two minutes partners will switch roles and the process will happen again.
  • After a total of four minutes of discussion between the two parties, those that are in the inside will stand up and shift left. We will repeat the process over again.
  • The inside will shift to the left one more time so that each person will have spoken to three people in total.
  • With setup, your goal is that this exercise will take no longer than 20-25 minutes after the bell rings.

Peer-Editing: Dairy Entries 1 and 2

Peer edit the person that is directly below you. Go to your partners page and a) read the document, b) answer the questions below in the discussion tab. This should take approximately 20-25 minutes minutes.
  • Redibility / Realism: Are your character's actions believable to the reader? Do we understand the reasons he/she does what she does?
  • Historical Accuracy: Do you include convincing and accurate historical details in your "historical fiction"?
  • Creativity: Are your character, your events, and your writing imaginative, full of images, drama?
  • Collaboration: Are you giving good feedback--based on the feedback questions--to your assigned peer review partners?


Collaborate:

The rest of the period is build for you to be creative and share your character and story plots with one another. Grab people that you want to intertwine mini plots with. Send messages to potential partners in the other class. Have loads of fun doing this! You will have the remainder of class to complete this task. Hopefully this carrot will be enough so that the first two stages are done with efficiency.

Ant Farm Diary Homework Instructions:

Diary Entry #3: From Crisis to Revolution Continued (Diaries from Chapters 2-4)

Task: You have read chapters 2-4. Chosen the five most logical and dramatic events for your character to experience from that reading. You will choose ONE more events for your next diaries.
Length:
300-500 words per diary entry. (We will do a word count. It's not an essay, so you should let things fly--but do revise and polish.)
Due date: Next Class
Where to publish: On your character's diary page.
Grading standards: In each diary entry, show images of this event in France, as experienced by a person in the social class of your character. Give us glimpses of your character's environment, actions, and thoughts. Make it realistic. Give your character voice and personality. Have them talk about, think about, and act with or against people with at least 2 others within the assignment per journal entry. You must link others characters on your page to their page. In your entries, it is encouraged that you include a reference to an article in the 9th Grade French Revolution Wiki that pertains to your character.

Homework:
  • Complete Journal Entry 3
  • Refine and Edit Entry 1 and 2
  • Know the Order of Events in Chapters 1-4
  • Read: Finish reading chapters 5-7
  • Find: The most interesting (and logical) five events in these years that your diary character could experience and write about in chapters 5-7.
  • F BLOCK: All of this will be due by Oct 30th when your next assignment will take place.


Stage Seven: From Moderate to Radical-- French Revolution Continues

(Oct. 27th B & C; Oct. 28 E Block; and Oct. 30 F Block)


Watch-- The French Revolution:


While watching pullout your C-C-C chart and continue filling out any missed information. If you have not started on this assignment it is time to catch up. The following video does a good job of clearly identifying the basic causes and some of the key elements of the French Revolutions coarse. You will not have any consequences of the French Revolution until near the end of the unit. Remember that the reading has more to add to your chart.

Watch he following clips from Youtube:
Part 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6EvakM9Waus Start at 3:30
Part 2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U2oHmIFNW_A
Part 3: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o8FMDHhth5A&feature=related

external image msword.png Causes-Course-Consequences.doc

1. Cause: What are the causes of the French Revolution? (Beginning)
2. Course: What are the major shifts and events that happened during the French Revolution? (Middle)
3. Consequence: How did the French Revolution change the course of human history? (End)

Quiz: Event Order Quiz Chapters 1-4

Students will have six minutes to complete quiz 11 question. You will put events in order that were covered in chapters 1-4.
1. Signup for a http://quizegg.com account.
2. You will be given a website in which you will log in and take the quiz.
3. Important note, once you start the quiz you will have exactly 6 minutes to complete it. Any and all quizzes that are taken will be reported to me. Do NOT make a phony name and take a practice run. This will result in no longer being able to do quizzes online that gives you and your teacher instant feedback that helps YOU succeed on the test later in November.


Password: Spivey123

Diary #4 and 5: Downfall of the State (Diaries from Chapters 5-7)

Task: You have now read chapters 5-7. You have chosen the five most logical and dramatic events for your character to experience from that reading (which was homework). You will choose TWO of those events for your next two diaries.
Length:
300-500 words per diary entry. (We will do a word count. It's not an essay, so you should let things fly--but do revise and polish.)
Due date: Next Class
Where to publish: On your character's diary page.
Grading standards: In each diary entry, show images of this event in France, as experienced by a person in the social class of your character. Give us glimpses of your character's environment, actions, and thoughts. Have them talk about, think about, and act with or against people with at least 2 others within the assignment per journal entry. Make it realistic. Give your character voice and personality. Include at least one detail (image or dialogue) that shows the following factors in your character's life during your chosen events.

Homework:
  • Complete Journal Entries 4 & 5
  • Read: Read chapters 8-10
  • Find: The most interesting (and logical) five events in these years that your Diary Character could experience and write about in chapters 8-10. You will continue your last dairies next we. There for collaborate with friends because you will have to link others characters on your page to their page. In your entries, it is encouraged that you include a reference to an article in the 9th Grade French Revolution Wiki that pertains to your character. In other words plan ahead!

Homework Due Dates: (Oct. 29th B & C; Oct. 30 E Block; and Nov. 1 F Block)


Stage Eight: From Radical to Terror-- French Revolution Continues

(Oct. 29th B & C; Oct. 30 E Block; and Nov. 1 F Block)


Watch-- The French Revolution:


While watching pullout your C-C-C chart and continue filling out any missed information. The following video does a good job of clearly identifying the coarse of the French Revolutions. Remember that the reading has more to add to your chart.

Watch he following clips from Youtube:
Part 4: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RkBMuinXEmg
Part 5: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TmIsrxmZgXY
Part 6: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iFoJqn0GISo
Part 7: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6zF9cmRKbBQ Start at 6:50
Part 8: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AgNfK7RaNE8
Part 9: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=agMMDI-84bk
external image msword.png Causes-Course-Consequences.doc

1. Cause: What are the causes of the French Revolution? (Beginning)
2. Course: What are the major shifts and events that happened during the French Revolution? (Middle)
3. Consequence: How did the French Revolution change the course of human history? (End)

Bring questions to next class. We have very little time left on this unit and will have to rush to the end. We will work on two more journal entries and make a timeline next class to make sure that we are all on the same page. Keep up the hard work. See you next week.


Stage Eight: To Terror and Beyond -- French Revolution Continues


Questions!!!

Throughout the week I had been answer question from students. I will be posting answer to your questions here. If you would like to submit a question please post your questions on the wiki-page below and I will do my best to answer them. Thank you YJJ for getting this set up for us.

Q & A _ Student YJJ and Mr. S <--- Update on 11/4/09

Character Planning Collaboration Time: 20 minutes

Go over quiz chapters 2-4

Create Timeline: Chapters 5-10



Diary #6 and 7: Downfall of the State (Diaries from Chapters 8-10)


Task: You have now read chapters 8-10. You have chosen the five most logical and dramatic events for your character to experience from that reading (which was homework). You will choose TWO of those events for your next two diaries.
Length:
300-500 words per diary entry. (We will do a word count. It's not an essay, so you should let things fly--but do revise and polish.)
Due date: By the end of next class
Where to publish: On your character's diary page.
Grading standards: In each diary entry, show images of this event in France, as experienced by a person in the social class of your character. Give us glimpses of your character's environment, actions, and thoughts. Have them talk about, think about, and act with or against people with at least 2 others within the assignment per journal entry. Make it realistic. Give your character voice and personality. Include at least one detail (image or dialogue) that shows the following factors in your character's life during your chosen events.

Homework:
  • Complete Journal Entries 6 and 7 (Due by the end of next class. Will have time to work on project next class.)
  • Find: The most interesting (and logical) five events in these years that your Diary Character could experience and write about in chapters 8-10. Also write down important events, people, places, interesting facts, collaboration idea on the hallway French flag! In your entries, it is encouraged (and will result in a high score) if you include a reference to an article in the 9th Grade French Revolution Wiki that pertains to your character. You can do this simply by linking the pages together.----

external image msword.png French Revolution Ant Farm Diary Rubric.doc

Flashcards: http://quizlet.com/666757/chapter-19-french-revolution-flash-cards/

Homework for Nov. 4th (B and C Block) and Nov. 5th (E and F Block)
Read p. 204-212 in your textbooks.

Take notes and be ready to discuss the final steps of the French Revolution concluding with the famous Napoleon Bonaparte. In your C-C-C chart we will start to see the consequences of the French Revolution. Printed C-C-C charters will be due at the beginning of next class.


Stage Nine: Consequences of the French Revolution


Final Journal Peer-Editing Session


The Rise of Napoleon

  • Discussion: How Napoleon consolidated power?
  • Explore the consequences of the French Revolution and record them on your C-C-C chart.

Consequences and Themes

We will have a Socratic Seminar in two groups to give more people an opportunity to discuss. This will be recorded as a participation grade. For the first part of the seminar, explore the question: "What were the consequences of the French Revolution?" During the second part, discuss the question: "What were the major themes of the French Revolution?"

Read "Independence in Latin America, 1800-1830" packet, p. 646-651 from Earth and Its People.

Bulliet, Richard W., Pamela Kyle Crossley, Steven W. Hirsch, Lyman L. Johnson, and Daniel R. Headrick. Bulliet, Earth And Its Peoples Advanced Placement 4th Edition. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2007. Print.


Stage Ten: Anatomy of Revolution


What is the Anatomy of Revolution?



Does the Anatomy of Revolution work for all revolutions?


1. Discussion of social structure.
2. Discuss homework and answer questions.
3. Start research on Latin American revolutions.

Groups will look at the following revolutions within Latin American and the Caribbean. Groups will break up the readings amongst their groups. When reading lookout for the patterns of the Anatomy of Revolution. Next time you come to class, you will work on the C-C-C chart as a group and create a video podcast.


Homework: Groups will break up reading in class for each revolution. Finish your assigned reading.

Stage Eleven: C-C-C Video Podcast of Latin American Revolutions


Product: C-C-C Video Podcast Project


Like all revolutions, the Mexican and Brazilian Revolution has Causes-Course-Consequences as you discerned last night through your reading. One of the major problems of learning about this revolution is that there is not a lot of written, audio or visual sources available. You will now engage in a project where you critically assess the information we have about the Mexico, Haitian or Brazilian Revolution and teach your classmates from other classes about the revolution through video podcasts. This will allow you to incorporate the best techniques that you learned from your classmates' podcast and iMovie projects. Your projects will be the only source to teach your classmates about these fascinating revolutions.

Your team will be responsible for Cause, Course, or Consequence of the Brazilian or Mexican Revolution as assigned. Here's how it will work:
  • Brainstorm ideas with your team about how you will present this information in a captivating way to your classmates.
  • Script your video podcasts next class.
  • Review scripts with your teacher.
  • Record your video podcasts.
  • Post them correctly on your assigned wikipage on the due date.

Your podcasts will be graded as a team project. If you have issues with a teammate, you must address them directly with your teammate. If your teammate is uncooperative, you must address the problem with the teacher before the project due date.

Example project:


Procedure: Scripting the Brazil, Haitian or Mexican Revolution (Day 1)

Complete the C-C-C chart:


In groups complete a C-C-C with other students in your group. Each group will be responsible for only one that will be handed in. Make sure that each member gets a copy of the C-C-C chart.

Breaking Up Into Cause, Coarse and Consequences Groups:


You will now break up into smaller groups that will work on creating a segment explaining either the cause, coarse or consquence of your assigned revolution.

Scriptwriting and Storyboarding

Each group will be responsible for completing this part of the assignment. You will need a script for cause, course and consequence. Remember that your podcasts are not merely "audioplays." They are also visual explorations of your assigned revolution. When writing your scripts, you will also need to find images that will accent your words. With your teams, begin writing your scripts and creating your storyboards so that next class you can begin working on your video podcasts. You may also want to spend this time finding images on Google and creating a photo album in iPhoto that you can easily use to generate your video podcast.

Homework:
Work on scripts, basic storyboards and image search. Continue posting your work here:
WH Spivey B 2009-10
WH Spivey C 2009-10

WH Spivey E 2009-10
WH Spivey F 2009-10


Recording the Mexican or Brazilian Revolution (Day 2)


Studio TIME! This is the fun part of the project where you can let your imaginations run wild! You many work with your groups for the entire period with your groups to create spectacular slide show podcasts. Make me proud! I'm looking forward to seeing your work.

Homework:
Final Podcast Due Date: 11/23 by 8:00 AM


Defining a Revolution! (Day 3)


Today we will look at other classes video podcasts. Each group was assigned a different revolution in which the "Cause, Course and Consequence" was analyzed. Today we are going to spend the next half of the class doing two tasks. The first task will be to explore other revolutions that took place during the 1800's. While listening to the podcast we will fill out C-C-C chart for each event. The second part of the assignment is to critique each others work on the discussion tab after listening to the podcasts. The criteria is given below.
C-C-C Chart for task #1:
external image msword.png Blank Chart.doc

Comment Criteria for task #2:
1. This podcast was helpful in my learning of the __ revolution because....
2. I did/didn't find the podcast entertaining because....
3. The pictures did/didn't enhance the project because....
4. Before Mr. Spivey grades this I would change.....


Establishing Patterns Task #3

Now that you have finished tasks one and two, it is now time for us to start looking at patterns in history. Look at the C-C-C charts and compare your assigned revolution with the other two Latin America revolutions and the French revolution.

latammap.jpg
Compare and Contrast!

Compare and Contrast!

  • What patterns do you see that are the same?
  • What are the differences?
  • Are there stages that each all three have in common?
  • Maybe two that are similar?
  • What are the unique aspects of each revolution?

external image msword.png Revolutionary Compare and Contrast Chart.doc

Share your ideas with each other and let's make some "laws" about revolutions. Next class we will look at a professor's take on the calculated aspects of a revolution.

Homework:
I. Organize and complete your Revolutionary Compare and Contrast Chart for next class. You are required to fill in three out of the four revolutions on the "Revolution C&C" chart. This should not take more than 15 minutes as the majority of this work should have already been completed. You are simply refining your notes. Remember that at this point you should include personal analysis and not simply facts. Make connects, adjust ideas, be creative with you ideas.

II. Start on Study Guide:



Stage Twelve: Test Review and Test


Test review: E Block 11/24, F&B 11/25 and C 11/26

Step #1 Anatomy of Revolution Search! (Download sheet)


Step #2 Go over Revolution C&C chart.

Step #3 Going over the steps of the French Revolution

Step #4 Open ended questions about the theme of revolution.



Student example of "Spivey Approved" C-C-C Chart:

Posted by Erin Kim, requested by Mr. Spivey

Other Review Source:

Thank you Ms. Boyle for putting this together!

Homework: Study for Test E&F-- 11/26 and B&C 11/27

Test Review (Peter Kim)